Fields & Irrigation
Lots of dirt and old building materials were cleared by our excavating contractor, bringing the fields down to the original acequia water line.
The turnout ditch to our property, channeling water from the acequia to our fields, was dug out and restored.
Our property’s turnout ditch from the acequia brings water to our fields.
A few of our awesome parishioners are ready to serve lunch after a morning of work. Meat from the first of our free-range kid goats was served, offering all present tacos de cabrito. What a treat!
On October 12, 2016, the Feast of Saint King Edwin of Northumbria, our parish opened the floodgates of its adjacent acequia channel to irrigate the first of our newly restored fields. Acequia means “that which brings water.” This method of irrigation was brought to the Americas by the Spaniards who adopted it from the Moors. From at least the time of the Atrisco Land Grant of 1692 these canals have been transporting water to farmers throughout the region. A representative of the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District was present to open the channel, allowing the water to flood our field. Many thanks to all who made this possible, and to those present for the event!
In the spring of 2018 New Mexico’s premier rancher Mike Mechenbier began chiseling, plowing, and laser-leveling our three fields. Water now flows through them as smoothly as over the kitchen table. Below our first, northwest field was planted with brutus fescue grass. It quickly took root and our animals now enjoy the permanent pasture.
The fescue grass on our second, southeast field is maturing nicely.
Freddie and Isabel take a moment for a picture.
Above our third, northeast field is being readied for alfalfa. With parishioners from towns like Abiquiu, Mora, and Torreón having settled in the South Valley, the collective knowledge and skill base is substantial. Everybody pitches in what they know.
Here the same field, having been seeded with alfalfa in April of 2019, has shown some development two months later. 
On September 7, 2019 the alfalfa was cut for the first time. 
Northeast Field Restoration
On September 13, 2019 the newly cut alfalfa was packaged, yeilding sixty-seven bales. What a blessed day! 
Two Fields for Grass-fed Animals
The turnout ditch to our property, channeling water from the acequia to our fields, was dug out and restored.
Our property’s turnout ditch from the acequia brings water to our fields.
A few of our awesome parishioners are ready to serve lunch after a morning of work. Meat from the first of our free-range kid goats was served, offering all present tacos de chivito. What a treat!
On October 12, 2016, the Feast of Saint King Edwin of Northumbria, our parish opened the floodgates of its adjacent acequia channel to irrigate the first of our newly restored fields. Acequia means “that which brings water.” This method of irrigation was brought to the Americas by the Spaniards who adopted it from the Moors. From at least the time of the Atrisco Land Grant of 1692 these canals have been transporting water to farmers throughout the region. A representative of the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District was present to open the channel, allowing the water to flood our field. Many thanks to all who made this possible, and to those present for the event!
In the spring of 2018 New Mexico’s premier rancher Mike Mechenbier began chiseling, plowing, and laser-leveling our three fields. Water now flows through them as smoothly as over the kitchen table. Below our first, northwest field was planted with brutus fescue grass. It quickly took root and our animals now enjoy the permanent pasture.
The fescue grass on our second, southeast field is maturing nicely.
Freddie and Isabel take a moment for a picture.
Above our third, northeast field is being readied for alfalfa. With parishioners from towns like Abiquiu, Mora, and Torreón having settled in the South Valley, the collective knowledge and skill base is substantial. Everybody pitches in what they know.
Fields & Irrigation
Here the same field, having been seeded with alfalfa in April of 2019, has shown some development two months later. 
On September 7, 2019 the alfalfa was cut for the first time.
On September 13, 2019 the newly cut alfalfa was packaged, yeilding sixty-seven bales. What a blessed day! 
Northeast Field Restoration
Two Fields for Grass-fed Animals